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‘Piece of Glass’: A New Perspective on Glass Computer Desk

Myopia

A glass computer display cabinet that lets you view the contents of your glass computer is set to make its debut at an exhibition opening in Washington, D.C. The glass display cabinet is the brainchild of a Russian designer who calls his project Glass Glassporn.

The project is being showcased as part of the exhibition Glasspwn, a curated exhibition curated by the U.S. Department of State.

The exhibition is called Glasspork: Glass Computer Displays.

It’s curated by John W. Smith, a member of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History and an art historian and director of the Center for Art History and Culture at the University of Michigan.

Glasspunk is a Russian-language word for glass, which in Russian translates to a transparent, transparent screen, and the project’s name translates as “glass computer display.”

The glass display is designed to provide a more immersive viewing experience, according to the organizers.

“We think this is a very exciting and creative way to use glass to bring more people into the world of art,” said Katherine Lefkowitz, the exhibition’s curator.

The glass screen is made of transparent glass and is about 2 feet (0.8 meters) wide by 3 feet (1 meter) tall by 6 feet (2 meters) high.

The display cabinet measures about 3 feet by 5 feet (100 millimeters by 300 millimeters) and can be set on a table or shelf.

The display is connected to a 3-foot-wide (1.3 meter) glass tube with a screen.

It can be used to watch TV, check email or access the Internet.

“Glasspork” refers to a glass sculpture that’s a piece of glass that’s made of glass, according a description on the Glasspunks website.

“This is a piece that’s actually the brain of Glassporks work, and is a really interesting one, because it’s a project that I’m really interested in,” Smith said.

“It’s something that is an object that I’ve been fascinated with, and that’s why Glasspinks work is so unique.”

The exhibition will run through Feb. 23.

The gallery is located at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

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